An Antique English Creamware Fruit Basket Greatbatch Teapot And Cover C1770-82 18Th Century Pottery
An English Creamware Fruit Basket Greatbatch Teapot And Cover C1770-82 18Th Century Pottery
An English Creamware Fruit Basket Greatbatch Teapot And Cover C1770-82 18Th Century Pottery
An English Creamware Fruit Basket Greatbatch Teapot And Cover C1770-82 18Th Century Pottery
An English Creamware Fruit Basket Greatbatch Teapot And Cover C1770-82 18Th Century Pottery
An English Creamware Fruit Basket Greatbatch Teapot And Cover C1770-82 18Th Century Pottery

An Antique English Creamware Fruit Basket Greatbatch Teapot and Cover, c1758

Regular price $1,425.00 Sale

An Antique English Creamware Fruit Basket Greatbatch Teapot and cover with molded spout and scroll handle in coloured underglaze with metallic oxides, c1758.

Dimensions:  4 1/2"H x 6 1/2"L

Condition: Restoration to tip of spout, knop and rim chips

Literature: "Most fruit basket wares were coloured to some degree.  White the ware was in biscuit state, the moulded fruit within the basket was picked out in yellow, brown, green, and grey...as can be seen in the photographs here.  Colours were applied under-glaze in the form of metallic oxide slips which flowed upon being glazed and fired.  Even so, the method of application is not always disguised.  The coloured slips were painted on to the pot in short brush-strokes sometimes, but not always, respecting the outline of the fruit.  Sherds of biscuit wares which have been coloured show quite clearly the way in which the painting was done; the short strokes are quite visible prior to their flowing during glazing.  The covers of fruit basket wares were coloured in the same way, although here is is the outline of the basketweave which is picked out, with the central area being left plain."  Source:  Pages 243 and 244 William Greatbatch A Staffordshire Potter by David Barker.

For similar tea pot please see: Plate 157, Page 242 in "William Greatbatch A Staffordshire Potter by David Barker".

Another example can be found in Reilly's "Wedgwood" Volume One, page 168, figure 135.  The pot is attributed to the Whieldon-Wedgwood partnership, however the pattern is attributed to Greatbatch.